Avoid These Garden Shed Mistakes

When making choices regarding a new garden shed, many people think of it as a small house. This mindset can be good if it leads you to take as many considerations as you would for a house but on a smaller scale. However, if it results in you dismissing essential aspects of the construction process, you may be headed for shed disaster.

 

Not Making a Good Base

The base of your shed, in the long run, may be the most important component. While a shed is light and small, it still needs a solid and adequately elevated base. If your base is not solid and impenetrable, creatures, roots, and plants may find their way into your shed. If it isn’t elevated high enough, water can easily penetrate, resulting in mould or water damage to your things.

 

Skimping on the Roof

One of the things that should take nearly as much thought on a shed as on a house is the construction of the roof. A roof is your first line of defence against the intrusion of moisture. For instance, if the edges of the roof protrude sufficiently over the sides of the shed, you will save yourself future moisture-related headaches. If not, you may be delivering water right into the side—or even the inside—of your shed.

 

Not Making the Shed Big Enough

Your shed needs to be as big as you can make it without intruding on other valuable space. If you need to store something in the future such as a newer, bigger lawn mower, you will want your shed to be able to fit it. In the future, you may also want to have the shed double as a storage space for things that were previously kept inside. Adding more space on the front end will help make this possible.

With proper planning, you can avoid these and other mistakes. The key is to take your time and think several years into the future as you decide how to build your shed.